Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Researchers find a 250 million year old microchip in Russia

if we dig it out, we might find it's a 3-dimensional circuit

have scientists in Russia really discovered an ancient/alien microchip in a 250 million year old rock?

This “ancient microchip” was discovered in the Krasnodar region, and ufologists have already tagged this discovery as a fragment of technology previously unknown to science. Like many other discoveries, this remarkable artifact was found by chance by a local fisherman by the name of Viktor Morozov who donated his curious finding to scholars from the University of Southern Polytechnic Nowoczerkaskiej who performed several tests and concluded that embedded into the rock, is a strange “device” which strangely resembles modern-day microchips. Researchers have not tried removing the alleged microchip from the rock in fear that the might damage it. [source ANCIENT CODE]

It looks microchip-like, sure, but for this blogger it looks just a little too organic, a little too artistic, a little too non-mass-manufactured.

It's not visually mechanical enough for our understanding of such calculating or control circuits. Look at the way the lines of dots are parallel and converge towards the lower end of the sample in the photo. Another question is, "Would it still work if you pushed the requisite energy source through it?" and what would that energy source be? Electric? Solar? Laser? Salty water? Or some other form of impulse or directed or electromagnetic energy?

Size-wise, it's not a microchip as we understand it, being about the size of a penny. Which is quite large for what we're conjecturing might be something that can power a UFO or alien spaceship or device of some kind. It'd be massive if this was how they microchipped their machines. And what if this is just a slice or cross-section through a 3-dimensional 'alien' artefact? What if it's just a piece of aboriginal art from some ancient humanoid race, it's still very old and curious indeed.

More tests and reports to come, one hopes.

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