Sunday, February 22, 2015

is Australia the slid impact-remnant of Earth's smaller second Moon?

could this have been pre-Australia looming over early Earth?


Australia is so strange, so alien to this Earth in terms of tectonic position and flatness and rock age. Elsewhere, there's almost uniform tectonic plate shifting and aging, whereas in the western Pacific there's this flattened lump of land called Australia and NOTHING ELSE in the devastation zone apart from a few volcanic spurts of islandage; Hawaii, Indonesia, Polynesia etc. It's like a lump of rock landed on the western edge of the Pacific plate and bounced off.

In fact, the following illustration shows what appears to be the impact site in the Marianas Trench region: old rocks in blue, new rocks in red. New Zealand and Indonesia would be the Impact Remnants of the second-moon landing that became present-day Australia (the video below does support such trailing debris for such an angled impact).


does this blue mark show where Australia landed, in the Mariana Trench 180 m.y.a. then slid south-west?


Planets and other rocks in space can have the same make-up, especially with the same accretion disc radial locality, so don't give me that look. Examine the gaps between the planetary debris fields...

  • Saturn's rings + satellites
  • Sun's rings + satellites

...it's all the same Solar System creation model.

furthermore, here's a DEPTH OF OCEAN image, again suggesting Australia crash-landed

and the lower southsouthwestern edge of Australia is compressed, turning a disc into a soft-croissant shape... this also gives us a DIRECT VERTICAL PATH for the impactor, free-falling in to our atmosphere just to the north-east of the impact site in the Marianas Trench region.

Incidentally, both the Himalayas and the Rockies are radially equidistant from this ancient impact site of our second smaller moon, if that's indeed what it is. And to those who say, "But plate tectonics shows that Australia is moving NEy, not SWy," you're right. It's moving NEy now as a result of having already settled upon the Australian plate.

I have a radius of 400 km, calculated from Australia's present surface area of 8,000,000 km2 and average crustal depth of 40 km, for the original second moon - now that's a lot smaller than my speculative visual mock-up at the top of this post: much smaller. Maybe some egghead could email/comment the calculations for the slowest gravitational impact speeds of two such bodies. I do know the Earth wobbles potentially because of such an impact and the Pacific Region is literally ruined or eradicated due to such. Is it possible that Australia was once Earth's (nearer, smaller) SECOND MOON and eventually soft-landed under free-fall gravitational forces hitting the Earth and splatting like the lead impactor in a slo-mo bullet impact video, like this:


that bullet remnant on the last frame, "That's Australia," is my contention.


FURTHER READING LATER: so, I thought, "Dinosaurs in Australia..."

If I find fossils of dinosaurs from post 200,000,000 years, my idea is dead in the water. There were stinky ancient bacteria from 3.5 billion years ago found which could tie in with the result of debris from an original moon-forming collision... but... look what I found via this graphical timeline of list of Australian dinosaurs.

wow, Australia had no dinosaurs before 200,000,000 years?

The last great dinosaur die-of occurred at the end of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary at approximately 200,000,000 years ago which would coincide with the relatively slow (in galactic terms) vertical arrival of Australia i.e. Earth's lost 400 km moonlet, into what is now the deepest ocean in the world i.e. the Marianas Trench, west-Pacific.

I suspect many of these ELEs or Extinction Level Events of the dinosaurs etc. happened as a result of the debris from the original collision that formed our moon (about 4.5 billion years ago) eventually cooling and sequentially falling to Earth many hundreds of millions of years later from low near-geosynchronous orbit. Based on past ELE timelines, it's feasible that Earth might have had several wondrous (sub 400 km) moonlets or moon-formed remnants in its skies for many hundreds of millions of years, seen only by the now-extinct dinosaurs. Each of them successively falling closer and closer to Earth until only our one contemporary moon remained.

The other issue with the dinosaurs problem is, "The 400km moonlet that struck in the Mariana Trench might have obliterated or dislodged landmasses that were already in that region." So the dinosaur record for Australia might originate from a more NEy landmass that its landing shattered. I mean, if you look at Australia, the tectonicists tell you it was formed from THREE separate slabs of land.

My other (newer) question is, "Iff this is proven," can we draw a picture of the Pacific region BEFORE Australia landed? I mean, "There's been some serious land-movements and crustal-deformities because of it," right? Astrophycists and plate-tectonicists unite!


ADDITIONAL TAMU MASSIF INFORMATION: Dr. William Sager talks about the discovery of a massive underwater ancient volcano in the Mid Pacific Ocean called Tamu Massif that is in the same position and SE-NW orientation as the 'proposed collision remnant' or bullet trace of the 400 km low orbit second moon in the above conceptual-garbage. :)


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